- 2ND JULY 2019 -

AFFORDABLE  |  ACHIEVABLE  |  EDITED FOR YOU


 

IN THIS ISSUE


MOST WANTED

PINK LADY

Rose tinted glasses? Yes please. Live the high life behind the lens… just make sure you’ve got an outrageously ruffled blouse and the tailored shorts to match.

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£45 ARKET

WEAR THEM WITH


THE EDIT

EASY CHIC

So is this actually it? Is summer finally here to stay? Since neither of us know the answer to any of these worldly wonders… here’s something you can solve. Your capsule summer wardrobe. It’s ageless, it’s size-less and the rules are quite simple. Stick to neutral tones, easy cuts, add a utility jacket (even if you’re wearing a girly dress) and ramp it up on the accessories. No prints, no fuss, no wardrobe fail.

Now that’s what I call neat ‘n’ chic.

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HERE COMES THE SUN

Crazy enough to wear colour or more confident in monochrome? It’s the modern mix of the two that will give your current wardrobe that much needed lift. Avoid complicated cuts and just make one splash of colour, key to nailing your new summer look.


THE EXTRAS

PEARLS OF WISDOM

Move over Grandma. It’s time to sling out those old fashioned strings… Pearls have repositioned themselves in the shape of mismatched, statement earrings, cute hair clips and gleaming gold pendants. Your summer blouse is just begging for them.

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IN THE KNOW

out ‘n’ about

CUTTING EDGE: MODERNIST BRITISH PRINTMAKING

Dulwich Picture Gallery, Gallery Road, Dulwich Village, London SE21 7AD

Until 8th September 

Living up to its name, for ‘cutting edge’ it certainly was, Modernist British Printmaking goes way back into the twenties when the Modernist movement started.  Lino cutting was considered a poor man’s form of art until a pioneering group of artists from the Grosvenor School of Art led by Claude Flight changed perceptions and put it firmly on the map.  

The innovative Dulwich Picture Gallery celebrates that wealth of talent with an exhilarating display of modernist prints from names you might not instantly recognise, but a style you most certainly will, notably those iconic travel posters, advertising the London Underground.  

It’s fascinating to learn how the original tube posters were developed by Powers and Andrews, two leading lights of the genre, as layer upon layer, working proofs come together to create a powerful poster message.

Print making, especially linocuts, caught on in the thirties and made art accessible to the masses for that brief interwar period and covered everyday activities from travel to tennis, leisure to labour. 

The exhibition highlights the work of nine leading artists with women excelling as a dominant force.  Artists like Sybil Andrews, Lill Tschudi, Dorrit Black and Ethel Spowers from the Grosvenor School spread the modernist mode as far and wide as Canada and Australia.  There are rare glimpses of old photographs from the period as well as snaps of works in progress, showcasing the tools of the trade.

As eclectic Art Deco style figures dance alongside Jazz age cars and angular avenues vie with pastoral scenes, it’s interesting to reflect that this was art that anyone could afford back then, when 2 guineas could buy you a print; nowadays valuable originals sell for five-six figure sums! 

Art for the people, was the message back then and still resonates today, for it’s impossible to depart without buying a card or catalogue as a stylish souvenir. 

And if that’s not enough, Dulwich has a fun packed summer programme of activities planned around their technicolour Pavilion, The Colour Palace.  Check supper clubs, art days or a family Colourfest, all the info is online.

Dorrit Black, Music, (1927-28) Linocut, Art Gallery of South Australia

Dorrit Black, Music, (1927-28) Linocut, Art Gallery of South Australia

where to go and whaT to do…

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SEE YOU NEXT WEEK ...

FASHION DIRECTOR JULIA MAY MORGAN | CONTRIBUTING ARTS EDITOR ANGELA KENNEDY

Missed last week’s EDIT? Click here to see it now.

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